The Great Eastern Drive is one of the absolute highlights of travelling Tasmania – travellers come from far and wide to witness the incredible natural beauty of the East Coast. While you may have already read about how I planned my Tasmanian road trip and the highlights here – I thought it would be good to show you in more detail some of the amazing sights and experiences you’ll find along the way. This beautiful drive is one of the best road trips I have ever done, taking you through sleepy little towns, rolling countryside and pristine empty beaches with no-one but the kangaroos and wallabies to disturb you. If you’re looking to get lost in Australia’s best kept secret, you’re in the right place.IMG_2357


Starting in Hobart, there is around 200km of spectacular scenery lying ahead of you so once you’ve seen the sights and experienced the cute little port town, you’ll be keen to get on the road. Check out my guide to the sights of Hobart here. I planned my trip according to the booklet available from the tourist information centre – 60 Great Short Walks – which is also available as an app and contains all the information in terms of locations, difficulty of the walks, national parks information and even what to take with you.IMG_2359

Tasman National Park

Not far out of Hobart, the first of many incredible national parks will take you round the Tasman coastline through Waterfall and Bivouac Bays. With opportunities to spot dolphins and seals in the glittering waters, and bright white sands lining the plummeting cliffs, this makes for dramatic scenery. You can walk for anything from one hour to five along this route by hugging the coastline and making your way around the bays, in the sunshine it’s well worth a walk.IMG_2380

Freycinet National Park

Wineglass Bay

The highlight of the East Coast – the sparkling gem in the crown of Tasmania – Freycinet National Park is famous as the home of Wineglass Bay and Friendly Beaches. One not to be missed in your East Coast trip, this is where you’ll find the iconic view over what has been voted Tasmania’s best beach. One good tip – if you’re not too scared of heights and fancy a challenge try climbing Mount Amos instead of going to the Wineglass Bay Lookout. It stands about 200ft higher and is perfect for adventurous bushwalkers – just be aware that this route involves slippery rock scrambling and shouldn’t be attempted in wet weather.IMG_2310

Friendly Beaches

One of my favourite campsites in the whole world – this one is perfect for any nature lovers out there. While the campsites may have very basic amenities with just toilets there, they have a whole lot more to offer travellers. This most eastern point of the island is perfect for witnessing an incredible sunrise out on the beach as you camp just a few metres back. Spend an afternoon wandering the shores of the beaches and spot countless whales migrating over November/December – we watched for hours as they jumped and dived through the waves. Around the campsite, you’ll be sheltered by the bushes from the wind and can look forward to spending a night with some of Australia’s finest – wombats and wallabies fill the campsite so be sure to take a flashlight for after dark. Don’t feed the animals and make sure to store any rubbish inside the car, but enjoy the moments when the tame creatures will walk right up to you with baby wallabies in their pouch. Absolutely incredible.IMG_2382

Douglas-Apsley National Park

Fancy another stop off? Check out Apsley River Waterhole and Gorge for a nice three hour walk that will take you through forest and along the rivers to the gorge. A good place to spot an endangered native fish called the Australian Grayling.

Mount William National Park & Bay of Fires

Don’t forget to stop at the Bay of Fires to marvel at the contrast between the crystal-clear waters, white sandy beaches and orange lichen-covered granite boulders. Stretching from Binalong Bay up to Eddystone Point and the beginnings of the national park, there are countless beaches, inlets and gullies to explore at your own pace. Perfect for surfing, snorkelling, swimming and just relaxing between locations.IMG_2306

After this, head inland across the North of Tasmania to explore the Cradle to Coast Tasting Trail to experience the finest food and wine the island has to offer. The North-West is crammed full of local producers of wine, cheese, chocolate, beer, meat and much more.  With over 40 businesses included in the Tasting Trail, there are plenty of  tours, tastings and much more available along the way. Follow the signs and pick up a brochure along the way for a guide, there are also various itineraries available for those who prefer to focus on wineries or food producers.

Planning a trip across Tasmania? Check out my road trip planning guide here and keep an eye out for my upcoming post on highlights of Tasmania’s West Coast.